Funding

1.- Assistive Devices Program

The objective of the Assistive Devices Program (ADP) is to provide consumer centered support and funding to Ontario residents who have long-term physical disabilities and to provide access to personalized assistive devices appropriate for the individual’s basic needs.

Devices covered by the program are intended to enable people with physical disabilities to increase their independence through access to assistive devices responsive to their individual needs.

 ADP covers over 8,000 separate pieces of equipment or supplies in the following categories : prostheses; wheelchairs/mobility aids and specialized seating systems; enteral feeding supplies; monitors and test strips for insulin-dependent diabetics (through an agreement with the Canadian Diabetes Association); hearing aids; insulin pumps and supplies for children; respiratory equipment; orthoses (braces, garments and pumps); visual and communication aids; oxygen and oxygen delivery equipment, such as concentrators, cylinders, liquid systems and related supplies, such as masks and tubing.

Grants are provided for ostomy supplies, breast prostheses and for needles and syringes for insulin-dependent seniors.

 

Eligibility includes any Ontario resident who has a valid Ontario Health card issued in their name and has a physical disability of six months or longer. Equipment cannot be required exclusively for sports, work or school. ADP does not pay for equipment available under the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board or to Group “A” veterans for their pensioned benefits.. There are specific eligibility criteria which apply to each device category.

An individual who has a chronic illness or dysfunction that requires long-term oxygen therapy may be eligible for home oxygen funding.

Initial access is often through a medical specialist or general practitioner who provides a diagnosis. In most device categories, an authorizer assesses the specific needs of the person and prescribes appropriate equipment or supplies. Finally, a vendor sells the equipment or supplies to the client.

In some device categories, such as adult hearing aids or prosthetic devices, the assessor is also the vendor.

Most devices must be authorized by a qualified health care professional registered with the program. Registered authorizers work in hospitals, home care agencies or private practice.

 

The program will only help pay for equipment that is purchased from vendors registered with the Assistive Devices Program.

 

ADP pays up to 75 per cent of the cost of equipment, such as artificial limbs, orthopaedic braces, wheelchairs and breathing aids. For others, such as hearing aids, the ADP contributes a fixed amount. With regard to ostomy supplies, breast prostheses and needles and syringes for seniors, the ADP pays a grant directly to the person. The Home Oxygen Program under ADP, pays 100 per cent of the ADP price for oxygen and related equipment for seniors 65 years of age or older and for individuals 64 years of age or younger who are on social assistance, residing in a long-term care facility or who are receiving professional services through a Community Care and Access Centre, and 75 per cent of the ADP price for all others.

In most cases, the client pays a share of the cost at time of purchase and the vendor bills ADP the balance.

For ADP supply categories where grants are paid, the client pays 100 per cent of the cost to the vendor.

There are many sources of funding for the client's share of the cost including:

  • clients
  • voluntary/charitable organizations e.g. March of Dimes, The Easter Seals Society, Kiwanis, Lions Clubs
  • social assistance, DVA
  • insurance companies relatives/friends
For More Information

Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care
Assistive Devices Program
7th Floor, 5700 Yonge Street
Toronto, ON M2M 4K5

Toronto 416-327-8804
Toll-free 1-800-268-6021
TDD/TTY 416-327-4282
TDD/TTY 1-800-387-5559
Fax 416-327-8192
e-mail: adp@ontario.ca

 

 

2- March Of Dimes

 

 

 

About March of Dimes Canada

 

March of Dimes is a community-based rehabilitation and advocacy charity for people with physical disabilities.Our goal is to enhance the independence and community participation of people with physical disabilities every day through a wide range of programs and services across the country.

https://www.marchofdimes.ca/EN/Pages/default.aspx

Contact us for an estimate.

 

3- Ontario Disability Support Program

If you have a disability and need help with your living expenses, you may be eligible for the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP).

ODSP offers:

  • financial assistance to help you and your family with essential living expenses
  • benefits, for you and your family, including prescription drugs and vision care
  • help finding and keeping a job, and advancing your career

 

If you require immediate financial assistance, please contact your local Ontario Works office (you can also still apply for ODSP).

Mobility devices - batteries and repairs

The Ontario Disability Support Program can also provide help with the cost of batteries and repairs for mobility devices if no other funding is available. Here are some examples of mobility devices:

  • manual or electric wheelchairs
  • scooters
  • walkers
  • lifting devices.

Who is eligible?

You, your spouse and children under 18 years of age are eligible for help with alerting systems, and batteries and repairs for hearing aids and devices. Dependent children 18 years of age or over are not eligible but may get help from Ontario Works discretionary benefits.

You and your family are eligible for help with mobility device batteries and repairs.

How do I get these benefits?

You need to contact your local Ontario Disability Support Program office to get approval before you buy an alerting system, buy batteries or get repairs.

Learn more

·         For more on the Mobility Devices Batteries and Repairs benefit, go to Income Support Directive 9.13

 

4- Interim Federal Health Program

The Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP) provides limited, temporary coverage of health-care benefits to people in the following groups who are not eligible for provincial or territorial (PT) health insurance:

  • protected persons, including resettled refugees;
  • refugee claimants; and
  • certain other groups.

The IFHP does not cover services or products that a person may claim under a private insurance plan.

Description of IFHP coverage

Basic coverage (similar to health-care coverage provided by provincial/territorial health insurance plans)

  • in-patient and out-patient hospital services
  • services provided by medical doctors, registered nurses and other health-care professionals licensed in Canada, including pre- and post-natal care
  • laboratory, diagnostic and ambulance services

Supplemental coverage (similar to the coverage provided to social assistance recipients by provincial and territorial governments)

  • limited dental and vision care
  • home care and long-term care
  • services provided by allied health-care practitioners including clinical psychologists, occupational therapists, speech language therapists, physiotherapists
  • assistive devices, medical supplies and equipment, including:
    • orthopedic and prosthetic equipment
    • mobility aids
    • hearing aids
    • diabetic supplies
    • incontinence supplies
    • oxygen equipment

Prescription drug coverage

  • most prescription medications and other products listed on provincial/territorial public drug plan formularies

Coverage for the Immigration Medical Exam (IME)

  • for most categories of beneficiaries, the IFHP also covers the cost of one IME and IME-related diagnostic tests required under the Immigration Refugee Protection Act

The benefits covered by the IFHP have certain limits including maximum dollar amounts. For more details, please consult the  IFHP benefit grids.